TurramurraIt might seem counter-intuitive, but the hardest-to-get Australian suburb properties aren’t the ones with the grand views. They’re the ones with tight-knit communities, excellent schools and great facilities for raising a family.

These suburbs are some of Australia’s hardest to buy in, with less than 0.5% of their properties being put up for sale over the past 12 months.

Recent data has shown that suburbs within 30km north and north-west of Sydney also have properties that are tightly held onto by residents. Out of the total houses in the area, less than 2% of them were put up for sale between June 2015 and May 2016.

Although inner-city areas like Windsor, Adelaide and Hobart also hold places on the list, these locations noted a large amount of leased properties during this period. This is a common indication of a high percentage of properties being owned by investors for their portfolios, not homeowners.

Everybody loves suburban Sydney

If you head out of Sydney, about 18km north west into the bush, you’ll come across North and South Turramurra. Unfortunately, if you’re interested in moving there, you’re fresh out of luck.

South Turramurra has ranked in recent data as being the second-most tightly held suburb in the whole of Australia. Boasting less than 0.4% of its properties listed, it’s closely followed by its neighbouring North Turramurra, which holds sixth place at 1%.

Matt Bourn, Director of a local real estate firm knows it’s about more than the scenery:

“In both cases, it’s heavily about community”, he says. “People get locked and loaded in there and don’t move out too quickly”.

Although heavily focused on community, Bourn agrees that there are also many other appealing features that the area provides, including its surroundings.

“Those two locations are known for their leafiness – it’s the complete opposite of the beach lifestyle. It’s got that almost Blue Mountains feel,” says Bourn.

Seated on the north side and neighbouring Bobbin Head National Park, North Turramurra is conveniently close to picnic locations, bush trails and stunning marinas.

South Turramurra has its fair share of attractions, too, namely cycling tracks and walking paths through to Beecroft, an equally-attractive neighbouring suburb.

In contrast to the giant supermarkets seen in neighbouring suburbs, North and South Turramurra’s shopping consists of a selection of high-quality boutiques and cafes, with bakeries also dotted around the area. It’s downsizes like this on shopping lifestyle that really promote a connected community.

The transport links are easily accessible also. “You are surrounded by beautiful national park, but you do have that convenience of all the major motorways and transport links to the city.”

Go West

Heading west, buyers are starting to catch on to Merrylands West, a low lease-rate suburb 27km from the Sydney CBD.

Although neighbouring Merrylands is a hotbed for local development and hosts its own train station, Merrylands West is largely comprised of bigger houses in quieter streets.

Local professionals aren’t surprised that as few as 1% of the area’s properties were listed for sale last year.

As with Bourn, they agree that once individuals move to the area, they realise how much they’ve lucked-out. After that, they put in their roots and are reluctant to move again. After residents commit to Merrylands West, they stay for a long time.

Prospective parents have also flocked to the area in recent years, eager to enrol their children in one of the neighbourhood’s host of renowned public and private schools.
Young families in the suburb looking for weekend activities aren’t short of things to do. Within the suburb is Central Gardens, a 12-hectare nature reserve packed with kangaroos and emus. There’s also two children’s playgrounds, a lake and several locations for barbecues and picnics.

If you’re interested in living the suburban life, get in touch with us now to discuss the properties available.